alternatives to creosote landscape ties

Railroad Ties Landscaping Alternatives : MANITOBA Design ...

Alternatives to railroad ties, Are some time off this article. Ties for gardening railroad ties the cost of using creosote and widely available substitutes included only part of coal tar creosote railroad tie is like a deg slope all affordable cedar which are some timber to a deg slope all standards for wood used in outdoor settings such as an alternative cinder blocks are less expensive to ...

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ATSDR - Public Health Statement: Creosote

Children may also be exposed to creosote if they breathe in vapors from or have direct skin contact with freshly treated wood found in fences, bridges, railroad ties, or telephone poles.

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alternatives to creosote landscape ties - mdcounterdrug.org

creosote, pentachlorophenol and inorganic arsenicals have been the most common preservatives used to treated lumber for play structures, decks, picnic tables, landscaping timbers, residential fencing, patios voluntary transition to arsenic free wood preservative alternatives in both the manufacturing and retail sectors.

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Creosote | Ingredients Used in Pesticide Products | US EPA

Creosote is a wood preservative pesticide used in outdoor settings such as in railroad ties and utility poles. It protects wood against termites, fungi, mites and other pests that can degrade or threaten the integrity of wood products. ... including landscaping timbers or garden borders. Alternatives to creosote-treated wood include the following:

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20 year old railroad ties (organic forum at permies)

Creosote is wrapped up in the black part - giving railroad ties and utility poles the outer black appearance. I would keep these away from food, but don't go off sending them to a landfill unless you need to.

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How to Seal Creosote Treated Railroad Ties | Hunker

Creosote is a tar-like substance used to protect the railroad ties against the elements. The EPA has not approved creosote as a wood treatment for residential use. The creosote on the treated railroad ties is considered a toxic substance and can contaminate groundwater and soil.

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Are Railroad Ties Okay to Use to Construct Vegetable ...

I'm using railroad ties to construct flowerbeds. I heard this is fine for flowers but not for vegetable gardens. ... Are Railroad Ties OK to Use to Construct Vegetable Gardens? ... However, because creosote is toxic, new ties can cause growth problems for plants that are sensitive to it. You can line your beds with plastic to prevent contact ...

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How long does railroad tie contamination remain a risk in ...

A: The reason the EPA has made illegal the use of treated railroad ties in vegetable gardens is the fact that they are treated with coal tar creosote, a pesticide registered both with the EPA and the state of Oregon.

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What Are the Dangers of Treated Railroad Ties? | Hunker

Railroad ties can leach creosote into soil and water systems. Eating food or drinking water with high levels of creosote may cause burning in the mouth and throat, stomach pains, severe skin irritation, convulsions, and kidney and liver problems in humans.

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USFS in trouble for burning creosote-laden railroad ties

The U.S. Forest Service, Kaibab National Forest, burned creosote-laden railroad ties without permission.

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Should I Use Railroad Ties In My Garden - Alternatives To ...

Railroad ties are common in older landscapes, but are old railroad ties safe for gardening? Railroad ties are treated wood, steeped in a toxic stew of chemicals, chief of which is creosote. Explore why and what alternatives are safer in this article.

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About Creosote Dangers: Facts and legal help for Creosote ...

Creosote is present in many wood products and is also implicated in many serious health conditions. In fact the EPA has suggested that creosote is carcinogenic. Over 800 million pounds of creosote is said to be used in wood products, as it is a good wood preservative. It is used in telephone poles, railroad ties and in bridges.

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ATSDR - Public Health Statement: Creosote

Creosote is the name used for a variety of products that are mixtures of many chemicals. Wood creosotes are derived from the resin from leaves of the creosote bush (Larrea, referred to herein as creosote bush resin) and beechwood (Fagus, referred to herein as beechwood creosote). ... or who use railroad ties or telephone poles in landscaping ...

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Can I make firewood from old railroad ties? in Firewood ...

Re: Can I make firewood from old railroad ties? « Reply #19 on: October 13, 2014, 07:22:08 PM I burned about 40 of them a few years ago in my outdoor furnace.

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Railroad Ties Landscaping: Everything You Need to Know

Railroad Ties Landscaping: Everything You Need to Know. A railroad tie, also called a railway tie, a railway sleeper or a cross tie, refers to a rectangular support used for the rails in railroad tracks.

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Is Creosote Harmful in a Garden? | Home Guides | SF Gate

Wood treated with creosote is resistant to deterioration caused by insects, fungus, mold and bacteria. Although creosote-treated wood is not used in products intended specifically for use in residential gardens, gardeners sometimes use reclaimed railroad ties as landscaping timbers, and these recycled timbers bring creosote into the garden.

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Dangerous to Burn Treated Wood - LCAQMD

Creosote is primarily used in railroad ties, utility poles and pilings. Creosote is derived from coal tar, which is a by-product of the cooking of the coal used in steel manufacturing. Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) or ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA).

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Build a small garden with railroad ties & the dangers of ...

I’m going to jump right in here and talk about creosote and the dangers of railroad ties immediately because I know that’s going to be the center of the conversation because just about everyone has heard that railroad ties are toxic.

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Alternative to Railroad Ties | Hunker

Over the years railroad ties have been a popular item for outdoor landscaping, probably due to their inexpensive availability and their durability. Still, a large heavy timber covered with a strong petroleum product, creosote, is not the most sightly or healthy addition to your property. As a...

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Creosote | Ingredients Used in Pesticide Products | US EPA

Creosote is a wood preservative pesticide used in outdoor settings such as in railroad ties and utility poles. It protects wood against termites, fungi, mites and other pests that can degrade or threaten the integrity of wood products.

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Railroad tie alternatives - please advice : landscaping

Railroad tie alternatives - please advice (self.landscaping) ... The Agency is aware that creosote-treated railroad ties are being used in the residential setting for landscape purposes and, in some instances, as a border around gardens. ...

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Landscaping with Railroad Ties | HGTV

Genuine railroad ties have had their share of PR problems, however, and you may wish to consider purchasing an alternative timber product instead of a used tie. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says that creosote, the chemical used to treat the ties, can be hazardous to your health and to the health of some plant life.

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Anyone ever burn railroad ties. | Hearth.com Forums Home

By burning railroad ties, you will be liberating the hazardous chemicals in the creosote into the air. Not good for you or your neighbours.

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